How to fix a Wet Basement

How to Fix a Wet or Flooded Basement-water in Basement Repair

Wet basements can be repaired using one of these four repairs-

Basement floor water-Hydraulic pressure repair
Block Wall repair
Exterior Outside repair

Foundation wall crack repair

Call/text us to get your repair done: 519-588-1970get a quote (wet basement repair service serving Southwestern Ontario-KW-Cambridge-Guelph-kitchener-Waterloo-London-Woodstock-Stratford and area)
Water coming up from the Floor- wet basement-How to repair a wet basement

Hydraulic pressure* is a common problem, that is a result of a collapsed or plugged weeping tile or no weeping tile or sump pump installed at all. This will prevent water from being taken away from under the house. To repair this problem of a wet basement – a new weeping tile or o-pipe-perforated is installed either inside or outside often in conjunction with a sump pump-sometimes called a french drain. Our most common weeping tile installation is an interior repair called a French drain.

The floor is broken up along the leaking walls and a trench is excavated. A Four-inch perforated weeping tile is placed in the trench and covered with clean gravel to help with drainage. All excavated materials are removed from the site.

A Delta or Platon waterproof membrane is installed to cover the wall and travels under the floor connecting with the weeping tile. The drainage system is routed to a sump pump which carries the water away from the house. New concrete is poured to repair the floor. The same results can be achieved from outside but the cost is considerably higher and not usually our first recommendation.

*Hydraulic pressure is water pressure forcing water up through the basement floor due to outside drainage water pressure coming down the outsides of your foundation wall-this downward pressure of draining surface water from e.g. spring rain falls or winter thaws -this forces water up through the floor-the opposing pressures try equal out.

Exterior Outside System Repair

If we have to repair from the outside or exterior-this type of repair requires excavating along the outside of the leaking wall or structure exposing the wall from the top down to the footing.  After the wall has been cleaned and repaired, a waterproof membrane is installed to cover the entire wall.  This system will prevent water from being in contact with the wall and will solve the problem permanently. A short slideshow on an exterior membrane install-repair. 

Block Wall Foundations -wet basement issues-

Construction block foundations have mortar around every block making hundreds of joints which can lead to leaking.  Construction blocks are hollow which means they can fill with water.  For these reasons, if you have a finished basement, or planning to build a finished basement, we recommend you always repair it.  There are only two repairs available to fix this problem. You can do an exterior repair or an interior, both repairs are good but we usually recommend a French drain that is installed from the inside.

The French drain is a much less expensive repair then outside system. You are guaranteed to solve two problems simultaneously. This system will deal with water coming through the wall and up from under the floor. With the more expensive exterior repair, you are often only successful in waterproofing the wall but not able to improve the drainage. Reason for this is because the weeping tiles around the rest of the house might be plugged, damaged or nonexistent and you would still not be able to control the water from under the floor. With the French drain, we are actually creating a new drainage system inside and under the floor.  This will control the water coming through the wall. We have never had a problem with this repair.

What we do is chip up the floor along the leaking wall. We dig a trench and install a modern 4-inch perforated weeping tile and cover it with gravel. Holes are drilled in the bottom course of block to allow the water to drain out. A waterproof membrane is installed over the trench and up the wall as water diversion system. The weeping tile is routed into a sump pump. If there is not an existing sump pump we will supply, install and plumb one for you. We warranty this for life (excluding the sump pump-its warranty is usually 1-3 yrs).

Water entry leaks at foundation wall cracks– Polyurethane foam sealant is used for foundation crack repair-repairs to stop water entry.* 
(You also need to find and correct outside water sources e.g. Grading your land so water runs away).

*Cracks in poured concrete walls that are larger than 1/4″, cracks which are increasing in size, or cracks which are otherwise indicative of foundation movement should be evaluated by a professional.Before repairing a foundation crack it is important to diagnose the cause of the crack and its effects on the building structure. The significance of any foundation crack depends on the crack’s cause, size, shape, pattern, location, foundation materials, the extent of cracking, the impact of the crack on the building, and possibly other factors as well. If there is an underlying ongoing problem causing foundation movement or damage, that problem needs to be corrected too.

With a 1% callback rate & 99% success rate of fixing the crack problems injection has been an accepted method of filling cracks. Almost all foundation repair contractors are switching to injection technique because it is-Cost effective-Reliable-Permanent* 
crack repair kitchener waterloo guelph

Procedure: stage 1  Seal the surface-Use a 2 part epoxy adhesive to seal over the surface ports and exposed cracks. The paste cures in about 20 to 45 minutes to provide a surface seal with excellent bond characteristics that hold up under injection pressures. The entire exposed crack is covered with the paste, leaving only the portholes uncovered. 
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 stage 2  Inject the crack: Begin injecting at the lowest port on the wall and continue until the epoxy or urethane begins to ooze out of the port above it. That’s the visual sign that the crack has been filled to that level. Plug the first port with the cap provided and move up to the next port, repeating this procedure until the entire crack has been filled with epoxy or urethane. Let the compression fall on the dispensing tool push the material into the crack using slow, constant pressure. This will reduce the possibility of leaks or “blow-outs” and allow time for the repair material to fully penetrate the crack. 
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 stage 3  Remove the ports: Allow 24 to 48 hours at room temperature for the epoxy or polyurethane to cure and penetrate into the cracks. The injection ports can then be removed by striking them with a trowel or hammer. If appearance is an issue, the epoxy surface seal can be chipped away or ground off with a sanding disk. Another option is to use a surface seal that can simply be peeled off the wall after the repair is fully cured.   

Call or Text us: 519-588-1970 or fill out this form that goes to our phones

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DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational purposes only. Do not attempt to fix foundation cracks yourself. Leave it to the professionals. Repairs methods & materials may vary.*

For Plumbing Services and Repairs- visit PLUMBERForHire.ca -they will fix water main and leaking-leaky pipes associated with wet basements 

fix wet flooding flooded basement floor – cracked foundation wall –
An OntarioContractors.com Listed Compan

Kitchener-Waterloo-Guelph-Wet Basement Repair

Wet Basement-Water coming up from the Floor -How to fix a Wet Basement Floor

wet-basement

With a wet basement-Hydraulic-hydrostatic pressure is a common problem, that is a result of a collapsed or plugged weeping tile or no tile at all. This will prevent water from being taken away from under the house slab causing a wet basement. To repair this problem of a wet basement -new weeping tile is installed either inside or outside often in conjunction with a sump pump. Our most common weeping tile installation is an interior repair called a French drain or an internal weeping tile or sump system-. Get a quote to repair a wet basement 

The floor is broken up along the leaking walls and a trench is excavated. A Four inch perforated weeping
tile-filtered o-pipe is placed in the trench and covered with clean gravel to help with drainage. All excavated materials
are removed from the site and trench is re-cemented with concrete.

internal weeping system

A Delta or Platon waterproof membrane may be installed to cover the wall and travels under the floor connecting
with the weeping tile for leaking or cracked foundation walls. The drainage system is routed to a sump pump which
carries the water away from the house. New concrete is poured to repair the floor. The same results can be achieved from
outside but the cost is considerably higher and not usually our first recommendation.

French drains are often installed around a home foundation in two different ways:

* Buried around the foundation wall on the external side of the foundation
* Installed underneath the basement floor on the inside perimeter of the basement

In most homes, an external French drain or drain tile is installed around the foundation walls before the foundation
soil is backfilled. It’s laid on the bottom of the excavated area, and a layer of stone is laid
on top. Once the drain is installed, the area is backfilled and the system is left alone unless it clogs.

Installing a French drain around the inside perimeter is most commonly done after the house has been built. 
Most commonly, this is done in response to a wet basement or right before performing a basement finishing. 
To install this kind of drain, the perimeter of the basement floor is jackhammered down to the footing and the
cement is removed. A layer of stone is laid down, and the drain is laid on top of it. Water is collected from
the basement wall floor joint as it enters, and a sump pump is installed to pump the water out of the house
and away from the foundation.

Once completed, the area is cemented over. This can be installed very quickly- 1-2 days by an experienced crew. 
The system is easy to maintain once installed, and the sump pump will need annual maintenance to perform properly.
An interior French drain is much less likely to clog than an exterior, partially due to the fact that it is 
not sitting underneath several feet of soil.

Interior French drain installation is an effective way to waterproof a wet basement but requires the use
of a sump pump. Many contractors will install plastic sump pumps that can quickly break down or neglect to install
a battery backup sump pump, making the basement vulnerable to flooding during power outages but this is optional. These are some of the considerations to think about when you get this work done. get a quote

Call 519-588-1970 or get a free quote to book us to see your wet basement or foundation block repair– We serve kitchener waterloo 
cambridge guelph toronto GTA and surrounding areas-

DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational purposes only. Do not attempt to fix foundation cracks yourself. Leave it to the professionals. 
Repairs methods & materials may vary.*

Basement Flooding-Wet Basement

Reduce your Risk of Basement Flooding: General Information

  • Causes of basement flooding on private property
  • What the City is doing to stop flooding
  • Stop the flood before it starts
  • Information on backwater valves and sump pumps
  • What to do when your basement has flooded
  • Keep your plumbing clear
  • About the sewers on your street

  Every home is at risk of basement flooding, even if there has never been a flooding incident. Water in your basement is most likely to occur when there’s been a heavy rainfall, snow is melting or we’re experiencing a spring thaw. The good news is that you can prevent or at least reduce the chance of this happening.

 

Causes of basement flooding on private property:

There are a number of reasons why basements flood. Flooding can occur:

  •  When stormwater or ground water seeps into the home (drainage failure):
  • From a sewer backup:
      • When waste water from the sanitary system or a combination of waste water and stormwater from the combined sewer system back up into the property, usually through fixtures tied to the sanitary sewer lateral, including the floor drain, toilets, sinks, showers and laundry fixtures located in the basement.
      • A sewer backup can result from a blocked connection between your home and the main sewer in the street, a sewer main backup or when the sewer system becomes overwhelmed with stormwater.

Cities take flooding incidents seriously and is taking steps to stop the overloading of the sewer system and reduce basement flooding. Actions taken include:

  • In Toronto-Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program provides up to $3,400 to owners of single-family, duplex and triplex residential properties to install flood protection devices, including a backwater valve, a sump pump, and disconnecting external weeping tiles from the sewer system (by severing and capping connected pipes.)-City of Toronto
  • Work is underway across many cities to make improvements to local sewer systems and overland drainage. Toronto has this- Basement Flooding Protection Program.
  • Regular inspection, cleaning and maintenance of the City’s sewer system.

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Stop the flood before it starts

Here are some steps you can take to reduce the likelihood of basement flooding.

What you can do outside the house

  • Seal cracks or openings in walls, floors, windows and foundations, and seal all window wells.
  • Clear eavestroughs and downspouts of leaves and other debris that prevent proper drainage.
  • Disconnect your downspouts from the sewer system, where feasible (without negatively affecting neighbouring properties or creating an area where water will pool on a sidewalk or driveway) .
  • Make sure your disconnected downspouts are draining properly, ideally two metres (six and a half feet) from your foundation’s walls.
  • Ensure the grading around your home slopes away from the foundation wall to help drain water away from your home (without negatively affecting neighbouring properties).
  • Increase the green space around your home with native plants and shrubs and install porous pavement to help absorb rainwater and melted snow.
  • Repair/replace damaged weeping tile systems.
  • Clear debris from roadside catchbasins (grates) to help water enter the stormsewer. (If it is safe to do so.)
  • Ensure drainage swales (shallow ditch) between properties are maintained and clear of obstructions.

 

What you can do inside the house

  • Ensure that your plumbing and drainage systems are in good working condition. Homeowners are responsible for the plumbing from the property line to inside the home.
  • Part of reducing the risk of basement floods is to understand how your plumbing and foundation drainage systems work and how to maintain them. Every home is different and homes over time have been built with different building practices and building codes. Some of what you should know about your home, includes:
    • Know the location and condition of your sewer lateral (the pipe that connects the plumbing in your home to the main line on the street).
    • Find out if you have a storm sewer lateral (pipe) and if so the location and condition of it.
    • Find out if you have a backwater valve or sump pump, and if so, how to maintain them. Understand what is needed to keep a sump pump operational during power outages.
    • Find out if you have weeping tiles and if so, their condition and where they are connected. (A weeping tile is a perforated pipe that runs around the perimeter of your foundation to intercept groundwater. The weeping tile gives the groundwater a place to go. Where it goes depends on the type of foundation drainage system your home has.)

To understand some of these elements of your home, you may want to hire a licensed plumber who can conduct specialized testing or inspection, often through video camera inspection.

  • Once you understand your plumbing and drainage systems, you also have to maintain them. 
    • Fix cracks, blockages or other condition problems.
    • Avoiding creating clogs:
      • Toilets are not for trash. Do not flush down the toilet items such as dental floss, personal care products (including “flushable” wipes), condoms, tampons, razor blades or anything which can block the sanitary pipe.
      • Never pour any fats, oils, and grease down the drain.
  • Hire a City-licensed and qualified plumber to install a backwater valve and a properly-sized sump pump and piping. Ensure the proper and regular maintenance of basement flooding devices in your home.Sump pumps need power to operate, so consider installing a back-up power source.
  • Seal cracks or openings in walls, floors, windows and foundations, and seal all window wells.

Click picture for larger image

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 Information on backwater valves and sump pumps

Consider hiring a City-licensed plumbing contractor to conduct a detailed plumbing investigation to help assess and recommend options to reduce flooding. It is advisable to get estimates before going ahead with any work.

Toronto offers a financial subsidy of up to $3,400 to homeowners of single-family, duplex or tripleplex residential homes to install flood protection devices through the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program. For details, go to: Basement flooding.

A licensed plumbing contractor (which we are!) can assist to:

  • Install a backwater valve (see diagram below) on your sanitary and/or storm sewer line to prevent water from backing up into your basement. Backwater valves need to be installed properly and regularly inspected and maintained. 
    Install a backwater valve diagram
    Important: Backwater valves are designed to close the sewer line and prevent water from entering your home. When the valve is closed you should not use any plumbing fixtures, such as toilet, sink, dishwasher, washing machine, etc., because water will not drain through the sanitary line and will backup into your home.

 

  • Install a properly-sized sump pump, (see diagram below) to help pump out water collected by the weeping tile system to an area outside. Make sure the sump pump empties onto a permeable surface at least 2 meters from the foundation wall. Sump pumps can lose power during severe storms, so you may wish to consider a battery back-up. 
    Install a properly-sized sump pump diagram
  • Backwater valves and sump pumps need to be inspected and maintained to ensure optimal performance.

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What to do when your basement has flooded

  1. If you experience basement flooding, contact:
    • For Toronto call 311  (24 hours a day, seven days a week).   City staff will inspect the problem, assess the flooding and attempt to determine the source(s) of the flooding.  Dial 311 on your phone or visit toronto.ca/311to enter a self-service request.
      • Don’t use toilets and sinks unless it is absolutely necessary until the issue has been resolved. (Any water sent down the drain may end up in your basement.)
    • Call your local Hydro to have your power shut off.  This step is very important in order to prevent shock or electrocution in the event that water has risen above outlets, near the electrical panel, etc.
  2. Call your insurance company as soon as possible and report property damage caused by the flooding:
    • Take photos of damage caused by flooding for your insurance claim.
    • Keep receipts from emergency repair work or clean-ups done to prevent or reduce further damage.
    • If the flooding is a result of a blocked drain pipe, leaking foundation walls or poor lot drainage on your property, then you are responsible for repairs and any subsequent damage caused by flooding. Contact your insurance company to discuss coverage.
    • You may submit a claim in writing with your name, telephone number, home address, date, location and details of the incident in Toronto:
      City Clerk’s Office, City of Toronto
      City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.
      Toronto, ON  M5H 2N2
      Or fax: 416-392-2980 or e-mail clerk@toronto.ca.

    Your claim will be forwarded to the City’s insurance adjustors for evaluation. A letter of acknowledgement will be sent to you.

  3. Be mindful of health and safety when cleaning up your flooded basement. Exposure to contaminants carried by flood water or sewer back-ups into basements can be dangerous. Homeowners may be exposed to waterborne diseases, corrosive cleaning agents and irritants found in leftover sludge from a flooded basement. Electrical accidents may occur because of contact with water and electricity.
    • Consider hiring a professional cleaning company familiar with cleaning sewage contaminated basements.
    • Keep children and pets out of the affected area until cleanup has been completed.
    • Dress appropriately – wear overalls, gloves, protective eyeglasses, rubber boots and a mask.
    • Open windows to let fresh air in.
    • Stay away from electrical equipment. Have a Licensed Electrical Contractor assess the situation to determine if there are potential electrical hazards.
    • If you can, shut off the electrical power. (Note: would affect the operation of a sump pump or sewage ejector).
    • Water could extinguish a pilot light on a gas appliance. If you detect gas, leave the house immediately and contact the gas company.
    • Minor debris can be put out for regular garbage pick-up (See your Garbage and Recycling Collection Calendar for information).
    • Discard all contaminated items that cannot be washed and disinfected, (such as, mattresses, carpeting, carpet padding, rugs, upholstered furniture, cosmetics, plush toys, baby toys, pillows, foam-rubber items, books, wall coverings, and most paper products).
    • Wash all surfaces with hot water and liquid detergent, rinse and thoroughly dry and ventilate the area. Use de-humidifier and fans if necessary.
    • Sanitize walls and floors using a solution of household bleach (mix 1 cup bleach with 5 gallons of water). Never mix bleach with ammonia or other cleaning products. For more details, visit the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.
    • Remove and discard drywall and insulation that has been contaminated with sewage or flood waters.
    • Wash all clothes worn during the cleanup in hot water (check manufacturer’s washing instructions) and detergent. These clothes should be washed separately from uncontaminated clothes and linens.
    • Throw out canned foods, home-prepared food in jars, meats and dairy products and any packaged foods that may have been affected by the flood waters – check for damaged packaging, leaks, and corrosion at seams and joints of cans.
    • If your freezer’s power is off, move the frozen food to another freezer or throw it out if you can’t keep it frozen.
    • If in doubt, throw it out. Do not consume potentially contaminated food. For more information visit Toronto Public Health for information on food safety after a power outage.
    • Visit Toronto Public Health for more information on cleaning up after a flood.

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Keep your plumbing clear

Avoid creating blockages in your plumbing and the City’s sanitary sewers:

  • Dispose of small amounts of cooking oil and grease in your green bin (making sure there’s material to absorb it). Never pour oil or grease down the kitchen sink or into the toilet. Grease can build up and cause blockages in the City’s sanitary sewer pipes, which can cause basement flooding.
  • Toilets are not for food, trash, dental floss, Q-tips, or other personal care objects, including “flushable wipes”. These should be disposed of in the appropriate bin.

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Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program-City of Toronto-GTA

Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program-City of Toronto-GTA

Help protect yourself against basement flooding
Work that is eligible
Subsidy conditions
How to apply for a subsidy

Download Subsidy Application Form 

Download Consent to Enter Form (NOTE: submit the completed Consent to Enter form to Toronto Building when submitting a completed application for a flood protection device installation permit.)

NEW: If it is your intention to apply to the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program in connection with the installation of a backwater valve and sump pump, please complete and sign the Consent to Enter form and include it with your application to Toronto Building for a building permit for the backwater valve.  The signed form authorizes Toronto Building staff to verify on behalf of Toronto Water that installation has been done according to Program requirements while they are on site to inspect the backwater valve pursuant to the Building Code Act to ensure compliance with the building permit.

Completing installation of the flood protection device(s) according to Program requirements is an important part of ensuring your eligibility for the subsidy.


Help protect yourself against basement flooding

Basements can flood for many reasons.

While the City of Toronto is working to make improvements to its complex system of underground pipes, sewers and catchbasins, these improvements alone cannot completely protect a home from basement flooding.

With increasingly frequent severe weather events, it is essential that homeowners take appropriate action to reduce the risk of basement flooding on their own private property.

To assist, the City offers owners of single-family, duplex and triplex residential homes a financial subsidy of up to $3,400 per property to install flood protection devices including a backwater valve, a sump pump, and pipe severance and capping of the home’s storm sewer or external weeping tile connection.

Work that is eligible

A: Backwater valve

Eligible work:

  • Installation of backwater valve
  • Replacement of existing backwater valve
  • Installation of alarm for backwater valve

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,250 regardless of the number of devices installed at the property, including eligible labour, materials, permit and taxes.

B: Sump pump

Eligible work:

  • Installation of sump pump
  • Replacement of existing sump pump
  • Installation of alarm for sump pump
  • Installation of back-up power for sump pump

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,750 regardless of the number of devices installed at the property, including eligible labour, materials, permit and taxes.

Note: Be sure to maintain basement flooding protection devices according to manufacturer instructions. Keeping these devices in good working order is an important step in protecting your home against basement flooding.

C: Foundation drain (weeping tile) pipe severance and capping

Eligible work:

  • Disconnection of foundation drains (weeping tiles) from the City’s sewer system by severing and capping the underground sewer connection

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $400 including eligible labour, materials and taxes.

Note: Disconnecting the downspouts from your property’s eavestrough system is not eligible for a subsidy under this program.

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Subsidy conditions

  • You must be the registered owner of a single-family residential, duplex or triplex property within the City of Toronto.
  • The property must not have exceeded the lifetime maximum subsidy amount for each eligible installation.
  • The subsidy is available only to existing homes, not homes in the planning stages or currently under construction.
  • The downspouts from your property’s eavestrough must be disconnected from the City’s sewer system or you must have applied to the City for an exemption.
  • All front yard paved areas of the property, including parking pads, must comply with the City’s Zoning By-law requirements.
  • You must submit your application within one year of completion of the installation of the flood protection device.
  • For backwater valve installations, a building permit must be obtained from the City and an inspection passed by a City of Toronto building inspector prior to the application being made.
  • You must also agree, at the time of a building inspection of the backwater valve installation or otherwise at the request of the City:

a) to consent to provide the City and its personnel, concurrent with any Toronto Building inspection, access to the flood protection device(s) to verify that the installation has been completed in accordance with the requirements and conditions of the Program.
b) to consent to the City and its personnel taking photographs, video and digital images of the flood protection device(s) to which this subsidy applies.

  • Your contractor(s) and any sub-contractor(s) who performed the installation of flood prevention device(s) must possess a valid licence from the City of Toronto for the installation work, at the time of installation.
  • Original invoices from the licensed contractor(s) and any sub-contractor(s) who performed the installation of the flood prevention device(s) must be provided with your application.
  • You must not have any outstanding taxes or debts owed to the City of Toronto at the time your application is processed.
  • Submitting an application does not guarantee a subsidy. Subsidies are issued on a “first-come, first-serve” basis, and are subject to annual funding approved by City Council.

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How to apply for a subsidy

 

Download the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program application form [PDF]

NEW: Don’t forget to also complete and include the signed Consent to Enter form when applying for a building permit: both the permit application and the Consent to Enter form need to be submitted to Toronto Building.


1. Obtain a permit from the City of Toronto Building Division.

Permits can be obtained at the following locations:

Toronto City Hall
100 Queen Street West
416-397-5330
Wards: 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32

North York District
North York Civic Centre
5100 Yonge Street
416-397-5330
Wards: 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33, 34

Etobicoke York District
2 Civic Centre Court
416-397-5330
Wards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 17

Scarborough District
Scarborough Civic Centre
150 Borough Drive
416-397-5330
Wards: 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44

2. Request an inspection for the completed installation.   

Backwater valve installations require an inspection by Toronto Building division. Please be sure to schedule an inspection before enclosing or covering the work. This will ensure the inspector is able to confirm whether the installation meets the applicable Building Code requirements.

3. Complete the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program application form.

Download the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program application form [PDF]

4. Include original invoice(s).

Include original invoice(s) with your application. Invoice(s) must show an itemized cost breakdown of all work applicable to this subsidy and the invoice must be clearly marked “paid in full”. If your contractor uses a licensed sub-contractor, please also include original invoices from the sub-contractor.

5. Mail the completed application form with the required documentation to:

Basement Flooding Protection
Subsidy Program
City of Toronto
PO Box 15266 STN B RM B
Toronto, ON M7Y 2W1

Application Summary:

City staff will review your application and determine whether you are eligible for a subsidy. If your application is incomplete or you have not included the proper documentation, it will not be processed and all documents will be returned to you. If your application is denied, you will be notified by mail.

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Redirect to City of Toronto page with this information-click here